First Committee: DISEC

Topic A: Restructuring The Biological Weapons Convention

The Biological Weapons Convention, is the first multilateral disarmament treaty banning the development, production, and stockpiling of an entire category of weapons of mass destruction (https://www.un.org/disarmament/wmd/bio/). Over the course of almost 50 years, the convention has been reviewed and adjusted eight times, with the most recent review occurring in 2016. However, much has changed in these past few years--from the advancement of technology to the introduction of the coronavirus--the way the United Nations must approach the BWC must change and must incorporate a new and modern take to regulating biological weapons. Delegates must take into consideration the vulnerabilities of the global population, in all of the new ways we are interconnected, and formulate ways that can ensure the development of new illnesses, such as COVID-19, are not maliciously used by antagonist organizations hoping to further their agenda. The goal of this topic should be to create a sound, more transparent, and more modern plan to safeguard against private firms, terrorist organizations, and authoritarian governments who plan to illegally take hold of biological weapons for malicious intentions.

 

Topic B: The Ethical Considerations of Biodefense

The question of ethics that surrounds preparation for biological attacks is a difficult one to address. It is extremely necessary to take precautions in the event of a bioterror attack, but it is also extremely difficult to detect when an attack has occured. The United Nations has frequently discussed the ethics of biosecurity, especially following the anthrax scare in 2001 (https://www.un.org/en/chronicle/article/challenges-biosecurity-advances-life-sciences) . However, rather than directing security policy concerns toward bioterrorism and biological warfare, the focus has shifted elsewhere. Research on biotechnology in order to better prepare the world for an attack. Delegates must consider the ethics of research, which includes the distribution of vaccines as well as clinical trials that expose law enforcement personnel to a number of diseases. In addition, delegates should discuss the potential risks of a new field in biosecurity: nanobiotechnology. The goal of this topic is to plan a safe, ethical, and efficient way to guard the world from biological weapons attacks through new technological discoveries.  

Secretary General 

 

Will Liscomb

wamuncsecretarygeneral@gmail.com

Director of Conference Relations

Isha Gupta

wamuncdcr@gmail.com

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